ChETEC


Chemical Elements as Tracers of the Evolution of the Cosmos

CEMP Stars as Probes of First-Star Nucleosynthesis, the IMF, and Galactic Assembly (Working Group Meeting)

The beginning of the stellar era in the Universe is a singularly fascinating phase in the history of the Cosmos. The baryonic material filling the Universe at that time, having a composition inherited from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, has its physical characteristics modified by the very first stars. Indeed, the first stars will change the degree of ionized material in their vicinity, and, through their winds and/or supernova explosion, will inject energy, momentum, and newly-synthesized elements. Some pockets of gas, enriched by the first stars, will in turn form new stars, whose initial composition is inherited from the first nucleosynthetic events. These low-mass stars can live sufficiently long to be observed today in halo of the Galaxy, providing the opportunity to obtain information about the very high redshift Universe by the study of nearby stars. How did these processes happen? How were these processes different from similar ones occurring in the present Universe? What can they teach us about the infancy of the Universe during the reionization era? These are the questions that will be discussed during this workshop, questions that are particularly topical at a time when new facilities, such as SKA, JWST, and the next generation of extremely large telescopes have as one of their prime objectives to probe this very period. At present, observational constraints on these first stars are scarce and/or indirect. Important constraints come from observations of the elemental abundances of very, extremely, and ultra iron-poor stars that likely formed from the ejecta of the first stellar generations. Of course the full story can be complex, as some elements might be formed by more than one source, and others may be somewhat altered by in-situ processes that occurred in the star that is observed today. Nevertheless, through the accumulation of observational data, progress made in numerical simulations, and in our deeper understanding of the physical processes involved, a much more complete and detailed story can be told.
  • CEMP Stars as Probes of First-Star Nucleosynthesis, the IMF, and Galactic Assembly (Working Group Meeting)
  • 2019-09-09T00:00:00+02:00
  • 2019-09-13T23:59:59+02:00
  • The beginning of the stellar era in the Universe is a singularly fascinating phase in the history of the Cosmos. The baryonic material filling the Universe at that time, having a composition inherited from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, has its physical characteristics modified by the very first stars. Indeed, the first stars will change the degree of ionized material in their vicinity, and, through their winds and/or supernova explosion, will inject energy, momentum, and newly-synthesized elements. Some pockets of gas, enriched by the first stars, will in turn form new stars, whose initial composition is inherited from the first nucleosynthetic events. These low-mass stars can live sufficiently long to be observed today in halo of the Galaxy, providing the opportunity to obtain information about the very high redshift Universe by the study of nearby stars. How did these processes happen? How were these processes different from similar ones occurring in the present Universe? What can they teach us about the infancy of the Universe during the reionization era? These are the questions that will be discussed during this workshop, questions that are particularly topical at a time when new facilities, such as SKA, JWST, and the next generation of extremely large telescopes have as one of their prime objectives to probe this very period. At present, observational constraints on these first stars are scarce and/or indirect. Important constraints come from observations of the elemental abundances of very, extremely, and ultra iron-poor stars that likely formed from the ejecta of the first stellar generations. Of course the full story can be complex, as some elements might be formed by more than one source, and others may be somewhat altered by in-situ processes that occurred in the star that is observed today. Nevertheless, through the accumulation of observational data, progress made in numerical simulations, and in our deeper understanding of the physical processes involved, a much more complete and detailed story can be told.
  • When 09 Sep, 2019 to 13 Sep, 2019 (Europe/Paris / UTC200)
  • Where Geneva University, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet in Auditorium A100 Sciences II
  • Contact Name
  • Contact Phone +41 22 379 23 98
  • Attendees Aldo Mura-Guzman The Australian National University André Maeder Geneva Observatory Anish Amarsi Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Anke Arentsen Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam Anne Verhamme anne.verhamme@unige.ch Arthur Choplin Konan University Arūnas Kučinskas Vilnius University, Lithuania Asa Skuladottir MPIA, Heidelberg Avrajit Bandyopadhyay Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore Beatriz Barbuy Universidade de São Paulo Bing Du Birgitta Nordstrom Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Denmark Camilla Juul Hansen MPIA Chiaki Kobayashi University of Hertfordshire Cristina Chiappini Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam - AIP David Aguado University of Cambridge David Yong Australian National University Devin Whitten University of Notre Dame Dogus Ozuyar Ankara University Else Starkenburg Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam Falk Herwig University of Victoria Federico Sestito Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg Friedrich Thielemann University of Basel and GSI Darmstadt Gabriele Cescutti I.N.A.F. Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste Gaël Buldgen University of Geneva Georges Meynet Université de Genève Jiannan Zhang NAOC Jinmi Yoon University of Notre Dame John Wise Georgia Institute of Technology Joseph Zepeda University of Notre Dames Kaitlin Rasmussen University of Notre Dame Krishna Choudhury University of Calcutta kwame appiah ghana atomic energy commission Laura Murphy Trinity College Dublin Leah Cox Lionel Haemmerlé Université de Genève Mahavir Sharma ICRAR, Curtin University Mattis Magg Insitute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Heidelberg Mohammad Mardini National Astronomical Observatories of China Myoungwon Jeon Kyung Hee University Nial Tanvir University of Leicester Ondrea Clarkson University of Victoria Piercarlo Bonifacio GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, PSL, CNRS Piyush Sharda Australian National University Rana Ezzeddine Massachusetts Institute of Technology Raphael Hirschi Keele University Roberto Gallino University of Torino(Italy) Romain Lucchesi EPFL Laboratoire d'astrophysique, ESO Sarah Dietz University of Notre Dame Shingo Hirano Kyushu University Silvia Rossi Universidade de São Paulo/IAG stefania salvadori Florence University, Physics and Astronomy Department Susmitha Rani Antony Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India Sutirtha Sengupta Department of Applied Mathematics, UC Santa Cruz Sylvia Ekström Geneva University Sébastien Martinet University of Geneva Tadafumi Matsuno NAOJ/SOKENDAI Tejpreet Kaur Panjab University, Chandigarh Theodora Xylakis-Dornbusch ZAH/LSW University of Heidelberg Thomas Nordlander Australian National University Tilman Hartwig University of Tokyo Timothy Beers University of Notre Dame Vanessa Hill UCA, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange Vinicius Placco University of Notre Dame Volker Bromm University of Texas at Austin Wei-Ting Liao University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Zhen Yuan Shanghai Astronomical Observatory Şeyma Çalışkan Ankara University
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MONDAY 9 September 2019

Part I: Observational Approaches

SESSION I: OBSERVATIONS OF VERY IRON-POOR STARS

TUESDAY 10 September 2019

Part I: Observational Approaches (cont.)

Lunch Break

SESSION II: EXTRA-GALACTIC OBSERVATIONS AND HIGH-REDSHIFT UNIVERSE

WEDNESDAY 11 September 2019

Part II: Theoretical Approaches

SESSION III: FORMATION OF THE FIRST STARS

FREE AFTERNOON/EXCURSION

THURSDAY 12 September 2019

Part II: Theoretical Approaches (cont.)

SESSION IV: PHYSICS OF THE FIRST STARS

SESSION V: EARLY EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES

FRIDAY 13 September 2019

SESSION V: FUTURE LARGE SURVEYS